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Tea bowl

Label Text

Korean ceramics such as this small bowl reached Japan through international trade. Their arrival coincided with efforts by Japanese practitioners of the tea ceremony to replace formal Chinese ceramics with a more intimate assemblage of tea utensils. In Korea, this small bowl might have been used for serving pickles or other condiments; in Japan, however, it was used as for tea, as indicated by the ring of brown tea-stain around the rim. In the course of use, the overall coating of white slip turned to dark ivory. This alteration in appearance was an especially prized feature of the undecorated bowls. Their shape and surface qualities had a lasting impact on Japanese preferences in ceramics.

Object Name

Tea bowl

Ware

Buncheong ware, Undae-ri type

Dated

second half of 16th century

Period

Joseon period

Medium

Stoneware with white slip under clear glaze

Dimensions

HxW: 5.7 x 12.8 cm

Locale

Undae-ri kilns

Country

Korea

Credit Line

Gift of Charles Lang Freer

Iteration

2

Shelf Number

27

Wall

North

Title

Tea bowl

Object Number

F1898.71

Freer Source

Yamanaka and Co.

Freer Source City

New York

Freer Source State

New York

Freer Source Country

United States

Image

http://141.217.97.109/plugins/Dropbox/files/peacock-jpg/JPEG/F1898.71.jpg

Collection

Citation

"Tea bowl," in The Peacock Room, Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Accession No. F1898.71, Item #3106, http://peacockroom.wayne.edu/items/show/3106 (accessed September 26, 2017).