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Bottle

Label Text

This piece, part of the 1898 sale of the Charles Dana collection, was described in the auction catalogue as "invested with a rich yellow and pale claire de lune glaze, permeated by a double crackle in violet and brown." Freer circled the entry and noted, "Most perfect." The reference to claire de lune suggests that Freer and his contemporaries regarded this as an example of Jun ware, which was produced in Henan province of China from the Song dynasty through the fifteenth century. Jun ware is characterized by its distinctive glazes, which range from greenish-blue to lavender and lavender-blue with violet splashes or marks. This bottle is actually a later example of a Jun-style glaze. In the Peacock Room, which Freer called "the blue room," this bottle was one of more than forty Jun or similarly blue-glazed ceramics displayed along the south wall, just beneath Whistler's allegorical mural of two battling peacocks.

Object Name

Bottle

Ware

Shiwan (Shekwan) ware

Dated

17th-19th century

Period

Qing dynasty

Medium

Stoneware with rice-straw ash glaze

Dimensions

HxW: 17.0 x 16.3 cm

Locale

Shiwan kilns

Country

China

Credit Line

Gift of Charles Lang Freer

Iteration

2

Shelf Number

95

Wall

South

Title

Bottle

Object Number

F1898.46

Image

http://141.217.97.109/plugins/Dropbox/files/peacock-jpg/JPEG/F1898.46.jpg

Collection

Citation

"Bottle," in The Peacock Room, Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Accession No. F1898.46, Item #3205, http://peacockroom.wayne.edu/items/show/3205 (accessed September 26, 2017).