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Charles Lang Freer to William Evans, November 2, 1904

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Title

Charles Lang Freer to William Evans, November 2, 1904

Description

Letter from Freer to Evans

Abstract

"I read with interest your comments concerning the arrangement of the Whistlers, and have studied the ???
[page 2] that for the bulk of the group of Whistler’s which you are ???...have “The Princess of Porcelain” is too high in colour to keep the others in harmony. It is one of the rarely brilliant specimens of Mr. Whistler’s art, and I fear it would hurt “The Ocean” and the Nocturnes: hence, I have decided not to send it. On the other hand, if Mr. Johnson’s “Lange Liezen” can be had, that would go beautifully with the other things you are to have. I feel that if you get Mr. Johnson’s picture, the arrangement shown in your sketch would look very beautiful, if you place the “Lange Liezen” in the spot chosen for “The Princess of Porcelain.”

Date

1904

Relation

F1903.91a-b

Type

Letter

Freer

Document Item Type Metadata

Text

#33 Ferry Avenue,
Detroit, Michigan,
November 2nd, 1904.

My dear Mr. Evans:—
A pressure of many matters has delayed my reply to your good letters of October 29th and 30th until the present moment.
Let me thank you for the very full information you have given concerning the shipment of the pictures to be loaned from Detroit for the forthcoming Comparative Exhibition. In accordance with your wishes, the shipment will be divided in two parts—the first will leave Detroit on Saturday, the 5th instant, consigned to Comparative Exhibition, #215 West 57th Street, New York City: the other shipment will leave on Monday, the 7th instant. The American Express Company will transport the paintings. Nominal values for the paintings only will be given to the Express Company. Insurance in transit is to be written as per your understanding, and specific insurance on the pictures while they are in the 57th Street Galleries is also to be written, as per your letter of the 29th, instant.
I hand you enclosed herewith lists showing titles and amounts of insurance for the pictures to be sent from this city.
I read with interest your comments concerning the arrangement of the Whistlers, and have studied the ??????????????????????
[page 2] that for the bulk of the group of Whistler’s which you are ???...have “The Princess of Porcelain” is too high in colour to keep the others in harmony. It is one of the rarely brilliant specimens of Mr. Whistler’s art, and I fear it would hurt “The Ocean” and the Nocturnes: hence, I have decided not to send it. On the other hand, if Mr. Johnson’s “Lange Liezen” can be had, that would go beautifully with the other things you are to have. I feel that if you get Mr. Johnson’s picture, the arrangement shown in your sketch would look very beautiful, if you place the “Lange Liezen” in the spot chosen for “The Princess of Porcelain.” On the other hand, if you have only one upright life-sized figure, why not place the “Arrangement in Black and White. No. 1” in the center, placing “The Ocean” on one side of it and “The Music-Room” on the other; then arranging your Nocturnes in a group of four say on one side of “The Ocean”, and placing “The Little Blue and Gold Girl” wherever she could be seen to best advantage. I wish you would think this matter over, and if you are pleased with the idea, adopt it; otherwise, arrange the group as best you can.
Should you find you need one or two more Whistler’s, I could send them to you on Monday next in time for proper hanging. One I would suggest, if you need more, is “The Little Lady Sophie of Soho Square” (the head and bust of a girl of about seventeen years) [page 3] in an oval frame: another might be “The Little Red Glove” (another head and bust of a young girl). I name these two pictures simply for your consideration in arranging the group, should you not succeed in getting Mr. Johnson’s picture. So, all you do, in case you want these two extra pictures, is to telegraph me on Sunday or Monday next, and if you want them, you shall have them.
I decided to send Tryon’s “Daybreak, May” instead of “The Rising Moon” because I feel it is a more advanced specimen of his art, and it requires a little less wall space as well.
The titles given in the two lists enclosed are now correct.
Mrs. Meyer has written me of her interview with you, and has told me about the article to be published in Harper’s Weekly. I have agreed to send her for the article a photograph either of “The Little Blue and Gold Girl” or “Arrangement in Black and White, No. 1., depending upon the success of the photographer. I have found it necessary to insist that no photographs of the Whistler’s in my collection shall be made without my personal inspection of the negatives. This has become necessary because of the atrocious reproductions heretofore made. Will you therefore, please issue instructions prohibiting the photographing of any of my Whistler’s while they are in your care.
[page 4] I am delighted to know that you have arranged for eleven paintings from the superb collection of Mr. Henry Graves. My recollection is that the specimens you are to get from him are of superb quality and I shall be delighted to see them again. It is inspiring to think of the fine Monticelli’s to be shown.
It seems to me that only the most pleasant experiences will come to all who lend pictures or contribute in any way to the success of the Comparative Exhibition, and to you gentlemen in New York who conceived the fine idea all thanks are due.
Yours very sincerely,
[signed] Charles L. Freer

William T. Evans, Esq.,
New York City.

Citation

"Charles Lang Freer to William Evans, November 2, 1904," in The Peacock Room, Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Item #3572, http://peacockroom.wayne.edu/items/show/3572 (accessed April 23, 2017).